Quick Answer: Is it OK to borrow a friend’s car?

Is borrowing your friend’s car illegal?

Although you should check your individual policy, most of the time you can let someone drive your car and still have coverage. As long as you give the person permission, and they only drive the car occasionally, there shouldn’t be an issue. … Find out what happens when you let a friend or family member borrow your car.

Who is liable if I loan my car to a friend?

In California, vehicle owners are generally responsible for damages if they allow friends or relatives to borrow their vehicle. … That means it will not cover damages the excluded driver causes.

How does insurance work when you borrow a friends car?

In general, when you borrow a car, you borrow car insurance, too. Insurance typically follows the car, not the driver. That means if you are involved in an accident while driving someone else’s car (not on your insurance policy), the owner of the car will probably be held responsible for any financial damages.

Can I drive my friend’s car if I don’t have insurance?

You’re not insured, but your friend is insured. Or maybe you have motorcycle insurance, but not car insurance. Whatever the case may be, you’re wondering: Can I drive my friend’s car without insurance of my own? Typically, the answer is yes.

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Can someone drive my car if they are not on my insurance?

If a friend or a family member has an accident and isn’t insured, then you will have to use your insurance. Unless you have expressly denied that driver permission to use your vehicle.

What if my friend crashed my car?

Your collision insurance will pay for the damages to your own vehicle if your friend crashes your car, if you have that coverage on your policy, as collision is optional. … So, if your friend is in a serious accident, the damages may go beyond your limits and that is where it gets interesting.

Can you let someone else drive your car?

No, it’s not illegal to drive someone else’s car. … But to give you an idea, according to the New South Wales Roads and Maritime Services website, you’re looking at a $607 fine for driving a vehicle that’s unregistered and a $530 fine for driving a vehicle that’s uninsured.